Brachypodium distachyon as a model plant in wheat rust research

N. Zh. Omirbekova, A. I. Zhussupova, Zh. K. Zhunusbayeva, N. D. Deryabina, B. N. Askanbayeva, B. T. Egiztayeva

Abstract


All countries share the need to increase wheat yield and tolerance to adverse environmental factors. Rust, the most common infector of wheat, is widely dispersed on the territory of Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). The data shows that on the territory of following countries: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Belarus, Uzbekistan the percentage of infected wheat with rust from the total amount is approximately 20-25% annually. Brachypodium distachyon can be regarded as a perspective model to study various mechanisms of a rust infection.

Keywords


rust infection; Brachypodium distachyon

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